Maximum of 20 posts per page. Displaying page 1 of 1. Pages: 1

Posted by Comments:
Sam Platts
January 7, 2018
We have both the titles "Son of God" and
"Son of Man" here, but they meant almost
the opposite of what is commonly meant today.
Caesar and other great men were given the title
"Son of God". It could apply to Lincoln
or Washington. Luke applied it to Adam. It did
not mean divinity was an attribute of the title
bearer. On the other hand, "Son of Man"
was a title reserved for the One we call Christ,
and meant literally true divinity. Jesus never
called Himself Son of God, but He did speak of the
Son of Man who comes on the clouds. Some scholars
say He was not speaking of Himself. Christians
say He was.


Posted by Comments:
Sam Platts
January 10, 2018
"How did you get to know me?" sounds a
little too colloquial. "get"?
"How do you know me?" is the RSV and NKJ
and is more profound.


Posted by Comments:
Rick in Canada, eh?
January 10, 2018
Hi Sam.

I suspect the translators are trying to give an
indication of the Greek. I'm in an airport, so I
don't have access to my texts, but I'll bet that
the Greek indicates a *process* of getting to
know, as opposed to Jesus simply knowing
everything about him.

Granted, there is part of us that would like Jesus
simply to know (the whole divinity thing). Yet,
maybe it's important that Jesus *comes to* know
Nathanael, to remind us that, even in John's
gospel, Jesus is fully human.

Also, I like your reminder that "Son of
God" was a *political* title, not a
metaphysical description. We spend too much time
trying to describe heavenly things, when we don't
even get what's going on in front of us (See
Nicodemus in John 3:12).

Also (again!), good point about both titles (Son
of God, and Son of Man) being in this text. I
think it's probably significant that John places
them where he does. Nathanael tries to name Jesus
the Son of God; but Jesus doesn't seem to take the
bait. Instead, he applies the other title to
himself.

Worth some reflection, that!


Posted by Comments:
steve souther
January 12, 2018
Hey Sam and Rick.
You got me thinking about the title for Jesus.
What you say is very helpful. I think Son of Man
defines Jesus apart from Caesar who claims the
title son of god. This title fixes in people's
mind the total authority and dominant rule Roman
wanted to project. Jesus himself said, "I
came to serve and not to be served." We
should remember this as we take leadership roles
in the church, and not fall into the Roman idea.

Nathanial misunderstood Jesus because he
assumed, like most, that where you came from can
easily explain who you are. This idea hasn't gone
away by a long shot.


Posted by Comments:
steve souther
January 13, 2018
Friends,
I read somewhere that the 'fig tree' was where
little children sat in the shade while their
parents worked in the fields. Can anyone confirm
this.


Posted by Comments:
steve souther
January 13, 2018
Friends, "Under the fig tree" (the Image
many scholars see as the classroom) was where
children usually studied the Torah.

As you said, Rick, "The title 'Son of God'
was a political term." And this 'politics,'
I'm sure, raised in the minds of the Jews the
image of Rome's terrible heavy hand as they
oppressed all under their occupying territories.

"Coming and seeing,' and "Following'
Jesus constitutes the pathway to faith, I think.
Without discipleship, there can be no growth in
belief. "Greater things" will come.

The image of Jacob's ladder is used. "There
is only one train on this track, and it goes to
heaven and it comes right back!" Nathanial
thought he had found the Messiah, but the Messiah
had found him. It goes that way up and down, and
nobody really understands fully the
relationship/covenant, or whatever term is used.
The shocking thing about this ladder is that we're
known way before we know.


Posted by Comments:
steve souther
January 13, 2018
Friends, again.

This image of Jacob's Ladder reminds us that
knowledge about the Bible, and especially the
nature of Jesus, is not a formula that can be
fully understood. It was completely baffling to
Jacob that angels would be both ascending and
descending on that ladder set up on earth. Gen.
28:12ff. At the same time!

Jesus is both from earth and from heaven--divine
and human. At the same time! He has to make a
decision (the same as we do) about where to go and
who he will see; yet, he also knows the story all
the way back to the childhood days of someone he
hasn't met. It was the same for the 'woman at the
well.'

Jesus decided to go... That is the formula set
for all time. It is in the 'going' that things are
revealed. Sitting under the fig tree is needed,
but the knowledge of heaven and earth somehow
begins to dawn while we are going...


Posted by Comments:
steve souther
January 13, 2018
"After further review, the ruling on the
field stands."


Posted by Comments:
Revhen
January 13, 2018
A prophet is one who sees things as they are and
points in the direction they should be. In August
of 1963, only 29 years old, I stood in the front
(but far off to one side) of a considerable crowd
and heard someone say "I have a dream . . .
." Jesus sees Nathaniel as he is and
projects what he will be.


Posted by Comments:
Revhen
January 13, 2018
How far have we progressed -- and regressed --
since that historic day?


Posted by Comments:
Revhen
January 13, 2018
How far have we progressed -- and regressed --
since that historic day?


Posted by Comments:
Sam Platts
January 14, 2018
FDR will always be associated with one word,
"Infamy!"
Martin Luther King will always be associated with
one four word sentence. "I have a
dream."
Gen. MacArthur will always be associated with a
three word sentence. "I shall return"
Lincoln will always be associated with "of
the people, by the people, for the people."
Trump will always be associated with two words.


Posted by Comments:
steve souther
January 14, 2018
And those two words? They are unprintable!


Pages: 1








Frank Schaefer for DesperatePreacher.com, 2005

Powered by PHP guest book 1.33 from PHPJunkyard - Free PHP scripts